Two quotes, a comment and a riddle

  • “Beauty Rules,” from a Lord & Taylor ad in the NY Times.  I think that beauty knows better than to rule, because in ruling it ceases being beauty.
  • “There is a lot of anger in love sometimes.”  Garrison Keillor, Liberty:  A Novel of Lake Wobegon, p. 181.
  • When is an addition a subtraction?   When you put clothes on a good-looking person.

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Modeling and Sexuality (2)

When I first started modeling, I did it in
answer to a dare from models and artists in my Hoboken (NJ) drawing
group that I would find it too embarrassing.  I shared this worry, but I
also recognized, with others in the group, that it didn’t make sense
for me to expect other people to do something that—because of
embarrassment—I wasn’t willing to do myself.  As soon as I opened myself
to public nudity,

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Drawing People Whole: Portraiture vs. Figure Drawing

Figure drawing is drawing people as people are; portraiture is drawing this person as this person is.  Figure drawing specializes in what is generic, portraiture in what is specific.  Portraiture’s excess is caricature, where individualism moves beyond reality by stressing the “unusual.”  We think of Titian’s last drawn self portrait, or Rembrandt’s last painted self portrait, or Bach’s, Bist du bei mir ( “If you are with me, I will go gladly to my death”) included in the collection he compiled for his wife,

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Modeling and Sexuality (1)

Many people are concerned about modeling and sexual expression.  For
many years I worried about this, even after I started modeling, and I
still recognize it, in myself and in others, as a disturbing event. 
Where sexual interest becomes evident in a modeling situation, it can be
difficult to temper so that it does not interrupt the artistic
environment.  In every culture since humanity began, our two chief
interests in other individuals has been loving them or fighting them: 

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Fondness Over Time

In the last article, I wrote that “fondness is key.”  To some people we are attracted immediately; with others, fondness—even intense fondness—develops, but only over time.  Initially, it is respect and openness that is needed if an immediate fondness is not there.  Find leads to found leads to fond.

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