Modeling for Miniatures

This post was written following a workshop on sculpting miniatures taught by Paris Alexander at The Artspace in Raleigh, NC in Summer 2010.
“I have three of you on my kitchen table in blue.”  Over the last month I have been having a new experience:  I have been making clay sculptures of two people:  three of a woman, and two of a man:  both of whom I have drawn pictures of before.
Making a miniature offers the same problem that making a monument does,

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What If I Don’t Fit

At the end of my fourth year in the seminary where I was studying to become a priest, the rector brought me to his office, and told me that I would have to leave, because people in a parish would find me uncomfortable to be with.  His judgment devastated me, chiefly because he was letting me know that my “not fitting” was somehow wrong. 

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“I Feel Pretty”

It seems reasonable to suppose that most people who choose to model for artists begin with a feeling that they are worthwhile to look at.  This is true, but not necessarily in a way that is evident either to the model or to the artists who work with them. 

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Real Relationships

Over the past weeks, my wife, Beth and I have watched a few movies which portray relationships of various kinds.

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Poems to Model With (1)

  When I model, I like to put as much of me as I can into the artist-model relationship – so I like to put talking and/or singing as part of the mix.

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Recognize and Remember

  There are two things that I want to stress in working with models, and I think that both are important.  I want to recognize people when I have seen them before, and I want to remember them between sessions where they model. 

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Teaching as Delight (3)

  Maybe the only impossibility that is real is repetition.  The only reality that is not new is newness.    At the same time, “novelty” is not new, because doing something to-be-new is “old hat.”

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Teaching as Delight (2)

   I have worked with many subjects, and with many students, from nursery school into graduate school.  As I have studied “teaching people,” I have learned that the “who-being-taught” is always more important than the “what” that is being taught to them; and that the one result to look for, in all of us, at every point in the process, is delight. 

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Teaching as Delight

  I got my first assignment as a teacher when I graduated from high school at sixteen years old and was asked by my pastor to prepare a ten-year old girl for her first communion.   I was scheduled to enter St. Charles Seminary as a college freshman that fall.  Maybe this was in some way a “suitability test,”

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Modeling for These Artists

A colleague wrote:  “I am not sure what would motivate someone to participate in a workshop program based on modeling for art as the theme.”  To me, the theme is more accurately described as “modeling for these artists.” 

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