A Monumental Presence (perspectives in life-drawing)

In life-drawing workshops, we typically place models on a stand. The practice may be more fitting, and hold more meaning for us as artists, than we realize.  This essay is an attempt to show ways in which visual perspective affects perception; ways in which traditional approaches to visual perspective discriminate against women; and ways in which artists and models together can work to alter both perspective and perception.

At first thought, it seems surprising that a model usually poses on a place somewhat higher than the people drawing are placed.

Continued

Share

Adding a “new” book!

Dear User,
Here is the beginning of a new book “Perspectives on Figure Modeling,” which I started writing 30 years ago.  I’ll plan to post other chapters later.  Please send me your suggestions and comments.
-Hugh Kilmer

ShareContinued

Share

Two quotes, a comment and a riddle

  • “Beauty Rules,” from a Lord & Taylor ad in the NY Times.  I think that beauty knows better than to rule, because in ruling it ceases being beauty.
  • “There is a lot of anger in love sometimes.”  Garrison Keillor, Liberty:  A Novel of Lake Wobegon, p. 181.
  • When is an addition a subtraction?   When you put clothes on a good-looking person.

ShareContinued

Share

Modeling and Sexuality (2)

When I first started modeling, I did it in
answer to a dare from models and artists in my Hoboken (NJ) drawing
group that I would find it too embarrassing.  I shared this worry, but I
also recognized, with others in the group, that it didn’t make sense
for me to expect other people to do something that—because of
embarrassment—I wasn’t willing to do myself.  As soon as I opened myself
to public nudity,

Continued

Share

Drawing People Whole: Portraiture vs. Figure Drawing

Figure drawing is drawing people as people are; portraiture is drawing this person as this person is.  Figure drawing specializes in what is generic, portraiture in what is specific.  Portraiture’s excess is caricature, where individualism moves beyond reality by stressing the “unusual.”  We think of Titian’s last drawn self portrait, or Rembrandt’s last painted self portrait, or Bach’s, Bist du bei mir ( “If you are with me, I will go gladly to my death”) included in the collection he compiled for his wife,

Continued

Share

Modeling and Sexuality (1)

Many people are concerned about modeling and sexual expression.  For
many years I worried about this, even after I started modeling, and I
still recognize it, in myself and in others, as a disturbing event. 
Where sexual interest becomes evident in a modeling situation, it can be
difficult to temper so that it does not interrupt the artistic
environment.  In every culture since humanity began, our two chief
interests in other individuals has been loving them or fighting them: 

Continued

Share

Fondness Over Time

In the last article, I wrote that “fondness is key.”  To some people we are attracted immediately; with others, fondness—even intense fondness—develops, but only over time.  Initially, it is respect and openness that is needed if an immediate fondness is not there.  Find leads to found leads to fond.

ShareContinued

Share

Modeling and Life-drawing: Fondness is Key

One of the things I have felt since I first began drawing people, and then modeling for them, is that I do best when I am fond of the people I am working with.  I want to be able to admire them, look up to them, and find them marvelous, so that my work with them can be my best.  Only my best will be good enough for them:  good enough for them to be their best for me. 

Continued

Share

Fighting and Loving

Since prehistoric times, loving and fighting are the two things that have meant most to people, both in doing them and in remembering.  There are why we developed art, poetry, music and drama: to give a lastingness to what means the most in our lives; a lastingness that stays on beyond us, not only for our future but for the future of the world. 

ShareContinued

Share

Save Stored Energy Until We Need It

There is a strong behavioral tradition, sometimes considered religious, sometimes considered “mystical”:  it always involves singing, dancing, prayer, until you get yourself worn out.  At that point, you ought to be healed.   “Tradition” is key: different traditions for different cultures, all of which indicate:
We have to work as hard as we can until we are worn out.
We have to recognize that, on our own, we haven’t succeeded.
We have to ask for help.

Continued

Share