21. Furniture and Appliances

A)  If the room is at all chilly, you ought to have a heater; afan may be appropriate in hot weather.  If you can’t get warm enough, put on a few clothes for posing: things will change.

B)  There should be a wide, sturdy model stand, with a soft rug
on it.  This brings the visual and mechanical center (the
pubic area) of a standing model more or less level with the
eyes of a seated artist,

Continued

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22. Clothes and Accessories

A)  A model’s clothes provide warmth, comfort, and (for many
people) a feeling of security, between poses, and provide
accents during poses.  An ankle-length robe can often be
useful for all these purposes, and can be useful as a rug,
if the floor is too chilly, or too rough.  Bring slippers,
too: tacks are a constant danger.

B)  Large hats, a staff, large or small balls, a scarf,

Continued

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23. Glasses, Jewels, Body Hair, and Other Decorations

Getting undressed for modeling is very different from getting
undressed for taking a bath or for going to bed.  “Costumes” reveal,
accent, and conceal; the modeling costume – nakedness – is designed
primarily for revelation.  Decorations which contribute to expression
of the self “at the moment” make nakedness especially effective in
its expressiveness.  Here is a “pot pourri” of examples.

A)  Glasses help people communicate, when they are needed.

Continued

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24. Other Things to Bring

A)  A large towel.  This can serve many purposes: it can be a
comfortable rug, a comfortable seat cover, a drape, a
blanket, a furniture protector, a hair cover, and so on.

B)  A model-release form (several, if several photographers may
be present).

C)  A piece of chalk and a piece of charcoal, for marking poses.

D)  A male G-string (simple, not “jokey”), or a plain leotard,

Continued

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