16. Where Not to Model

A)  Don’t model at a place so far from home that travel is
extremely time-consuming.

B)  Don’t model in your immediate neighborhood, unless you are
comfortable with being recognized as a model.

C)  Don’t model in a neighborhood where you feel unsafe by

yourself, unless you are assured of good companionship to
a more comfortable neighborhood after evening sessions.

D)  Don’t model at a studio that isn’t properly comfortable for
you (see Section 2E).

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17. Burnout

Models often leave the profession after very few months or
years.  As ordinarily practiced, the profession is thankless and
lonely.  It is usually better to stop before you get bored and angry
– and then to start again later – than it is to go on until you
simply can’t stand it any longer.  Burned-out models, like any other
professionals suffering from burnout, can be harmful, rather than
helpful,

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18. Who Should Not Model

A)  People who can’t find a way to enjoy modeling should not
model.

B)  People who can’t get comfortable with nudity should not
model nude.

C)  People under sixteen should not model except with the
company of a trusted older relative or friend.

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Time Out!

Sections ten through eighteen have been presented pretty grimly
and very negatively.  In some sense, their main message is: “When you
find a problem, follow your own good judgment, instead of these
suggestions or any others”.  Work with photographers can be exciting
and productive; posing with other people, especially when those
people are dear to you, can be tremendously inspiring both to you and
to artists who work with you. 

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19. Types of Poses

A)  “Stretched” poses: usually short, (30 seconds to 2 minutes)
take unusual shapes, usually feel stretched; used by artists
for studies in foreshortening, action, and “character”.
These serve well as “warm ups” both for models and for
artists, and can offer excitement and variety not possible
in longer poses.

B)  Moving poses: continuous slow-motion poses from one position
to another: used by artists for studies in shape-changing,

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20. Practicing Poses

This section expands on the section above, offering general
remarks first, then going into suggestions regarding each type of
pose described above.  A full-length mirror is a very useful tool for
people practising any kind of pose; it helps you be aware of how you
come across.  Models often pose in  front of a group rather than in
the middle of it.  Even so, it is important to remember that you
exist in three dimensions,

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21. Furniture and Appliances

A)  If the room is at all chilly, you ought to have a heater; afan may be appropriate in hot weather.  If you can’t get warm enough, put on a few clothes for posing: things will change.

B)  There should be a wide, sturdy model stand, with a soft rug
on it.  This brings the visual and mechanical center (the
pubic area) of a standing model more or less level with the
eyes of a seated artist,

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22. Clothes and Accessories

A)  A model’s clothes provide warmth, comfort, and (for many
people) a feeling of security, between poses, and provide
accents during poses.  An ankle-length robe can often be
useful for all these purposes, and can be useful as a rug,
if the floor is too chilly, or too rough.  Bring slippers,
too: tacks are a constant danger.

B)  Large hats, a staff, large or small balls, a scarf,

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23. Glasses, Jewels, Body Hair, and Other Decorations

Getting undressed for modeling is very different from getting
undressed for taking a bath or for going to bed.  “Costumes” reveal,
accent, and conceal; the modeling costume – nakedness – is designed
primarily for revelation.  Decorations which contribute to expression
of the self “at the moment” make nakedness especially effective in
its expressiveness.  Here is a “pot pourri” of examples.

A)  Glasses help people communicate, when they are needed.

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24. Other Things to Bring

A)  A large towel.  This can serve many purposes: it can be a
comfortable rug, a comfortable seat cover, a drape, a
blanket, a furniture protector, a hair cover, and so on.

B)  A model-release form (several, if several photographers may
be present).

C)  A piece of chalk and a piece of charcoal, for marking poses.

D)  A male G-string (simple, not “jokey”), or a plain leotard,

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