6. Length of Sessions

There are three basic types of modeling sessions with a group.
The first is a two-hour or under session.  This kind is non-tiring,
but likely to be unsatisfying both for model and for artist, because
neither can get “all the way into it.”  For models, it is likely not
to provide enough income to make it worthwhile, unless it is very
close to home, and does not interrupt other activities. 

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7. Holding Poses

A)  When you take a long pose, take time to settle into it.
First take a pose, one you can be comfortable with. If a
pose you take turns out to be uncomfortable, change position.

B)  In long poses, try to balance weight evenly, and be sure to
use padding (folded cloth or pillow) at pressure points such
as knees and elbows.

C)  Concentrate attention on something of interest that isn’t
moving much: one of the artists,

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8. Breaks and How to Use Them

A)  There should be a short break (about five minutes long),
every twenty minutes, to help artists and models to
concentrate properly, to change position, and to get a
fresh perspective.

B)  It is useful to have one long break, during sessions that
last two hours or longer, for conversation and refreshment.

C)  During breaks, it is helpful for models to move around and
socialize (without clothes,

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9. Exercises

A regular course of exercises can help you gain greater control
of your body, especially for moving poses, stretched poses, and long
poses.  Yoga is especially helpful for long poses.

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10. Models and Artists: Terms of Address

To safeguard their privacy, models are often addressed by first
name only.  Models can follow the same system in addressing artists
and group leaders (e.g. instructors).  To increase recognition,
interest, and respect, models can introduce themselves by full name
at some point in the session, and offer a little background
information on themselves.  This points out to other people that they
respect themselves as members of their profession.  It is good to
overcome tendencies to hide personal identity,

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11. Sexual Stirrings

During drawing sessions, a model may experience sexual
stirrings.  The more intense a session is, the more likely it is that
they will occur, as part of the overall intensification of the
experience.  They occur for artists, also, for the same reason.
These stirrings are not usually very noticeable, and are most likely
to be taken in stride by people who do notice them.  Partial, and
even full, erection of primary sexual organs (genitals) and of
secondary sexual organs (most noticeably nipples,

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14. When Not to Sign a Model Release

Do not sign a model release:

A)  If the photographer and a witness do not sign also.

B)  If you are not provided with a copy of the signed release.

C)  If you are not convinced that the photographer’s work will
represent you in a way that you approve.  This matter
includes the photographer’s choice of potential publishers.

D)  If a model release provided by the photographer seems to
provide protection only for the photographer,

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12. Unexpected Visitors

A)  Friends and Relations

Sometimes people you know from your role in life as a stock
broker (or something) turn up at a session where you are modeling.
This may embarrass you, or your contact, or both.  There are several
possible responses.  Here are several suggestions – one of them,
where you are “up to it” by far the best; one of them by far the
worst.

1)  Ask the contact please not to take part in the session,

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13. Group Poses

Some models are asked to pose nude with other people.  As in the
case of photography sessions, the situation should be arranged ahead
of time, and may be refused, even then.  At the very least, models
must be compatible with each other, and the qualifications they
require for posing with someone else (what age or what sex a partner
should be, for example), needs to be respected and accepted.

Posing nude with someone else is basically an intimate experience,

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15. When Not to Continue With an Artist or Workshop

After you begin to work with an artist, you can usually tell vei
quickly – often within the first session – whether you wish to work
there again.  Refuse to take part again:

A)  If your rights are not respected.

B)  If the individual or group does not take the session

seriously (sometimes people are “too busy” with conversatior
to concentrate on art work).

C)  If you feel that,

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